Megan Thee Stallion’s Label Countersues Over Contract Dispute


Megan Thee Stallion’s label 1501 Licensed Leisure—which she sued final month, for the second time—has filed a countersuit in Harris County District Courtroom, claiming the Houston rapper is in breach of contract, and that her newest launch One thing for Thee Hotties “doesn’t meet the necessities of an “album” below the three contracts that she has signed with 1501.” In line with paperwork considered by Pitchfork, the label seeks a declaration from the court docket that the document shouldn’t be an album, financial damages primarily based on the contract breaches, and attorneys’ charges and prices.

“That is one more absurd try by 1501 to ignore Megan’s album and squeeze more cash and extra free work out of her for so long as attainable,” Megan Thee Stallion’s legal professional Brad Hancock says. “We are going to ask the court docket to guard Megan from such a abuse.” Megan filed her second swimsuit towards 1501 in Harris County final month, alleging the label refused to permit her to satisfy the phrases of her contract by denying that her LP One thing for Thee Hotties didn’t meet the authorized definition of an “album.” 

The countersuit additionally reveals new particulars in regards to the recording contracts that Megan discovered onerous sufficient to warrant submitting her authentic lawsuit. The label alleges that the phrases of a number of contracts Megan has signed with the label—together with a distribution cope with Houston rap luminary J. Prince and Lyor Cohen’s 300 Leisure—requires a launch to comprise “at the least 12 new grasp recordings of her studio performances of previously-unreleased musical compositions” and approval from the label previous to launch. Of the 21 tracks on One thing for Thee Hotties, 12 are certainly authentic compositions that had not beforehand obtained an official launch. 

In her authentic swimsuit, Megan claimed the one contractually obligated parameter defining a launch as an album was a 45-minute runtime, which she exceeded by two seconds. In its countersuit, 1501 argues that as a result of the document’s monitor record accommodates a number of interludes, YouTube freestyles, and “archival materials,” the entire runtime of recent recordings is barely 29 minutes lengthy. 

In a letter despatched final month to 1501’s attorneys and considered by Pitchfork, Hancock states: 

“There aren’t any different parameters or necessities below the contract for what may be deemed an ‘Album’ apart from whole run time of the album. Moreover, nothing within the recording settlement places any limits or restrictions on the character of the content material that makes up the ‘Album.’ As such, an ‘Album’ might encompass a compilation of musical compositions, no matter when the musical recordings have been initially launched, together with spoken interlude recordings (i.e., skits).”



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Megan Thee Stallion’s label 1501 Licensed Leisure—which she sued final month, for the second time—has filed a countersuit in Harris County District Courtroom, claiming the Houston rapper is in breach of contract, and that her newest launch One thing for Thee Hotties “doesn’t meet the necessities of an “album” below the three contracts that she…

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